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Cat on a Soft Blanket

Adoption Information

Get approved by clicking the box and filling out an application. It will get sent directly sent to us! Applications are usually approved within 2 business days.

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Our cat says how dare we have the dog application ready before the cat application. We now get this look.

Setting up our adopters for success!

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How to help your newly adopted dog!

REGARDLESS OF WHAT YOUR DOG’S HISTORY IS, RESPECT THEM ENOUGH TO TRAIN THEM!

 

Through following proper MANAGEMENT & STRUCTURE, we are confident your new best friend will never find themselves back in the slammer.  

 

DECOMPRESSION - This is a real thing for shelter dogs that all of a sudden find themselves in a new living situation.  We see it all the time when dogs first come into our facility.  They need a couple of days to a few weeks before they get comfortable. It’s a MAJOR change to their life whether they are coming into the shelter or leaving the shelter.  And as much as you want to show them a life full of love, liberty and freedom right away, it’s best to hold off on that… At least initially!

LESS is MORE to a dog that has spent some time in the shelter.  Too much spoiling leads to entitlement and more unwanted behaviors, which is most likely WHY the dog ended up in the shelter in the first place. 

 

Recommended Equipment:

  1. Crate

  2. Treat Pouch

  3. 6ft Standard Leash

  4. 15-20ft Non-Retractable Leash 

  5. Soft Treats; We use Bil Jac here

 

MANAGEMENT STRATEGY

For the next 2-4 weeks…  

  • Keep the dog on a 6ft leash inside the house tethered to you. 

  • If you cannot have the dog tethered to you, tether it to a dog bed. 

  • Or have them in an appropriate sized crate. 

  • Dog goes outside to potty on the long leash WITH A PERSON… EVEN IF YOU HAVE A FENCED IN YARD!!!

  • Teach the dog how to be calm at your feet through an exercise called STAND/SIT ON THE LEASH (See Attached). 

 

After the first two weeks…***IF things are going well with the management strategy listed above. 

  • Let the dog drag the leash around while inside the house. 

    • This is important because if you do need to intervene on unwanted behaviors you have 6ft to get to the dog and it limits the conflict of reaching for the dogs collar. 

  • IF YOU WANT… Invite the dog up on your personal spaces such as the couch, chairs and bed. 

Word of Caution on Affection/Physical Touch: 

  • Use it in moderation! Treat it like a commodity! 

  • This has the potential of becoming one of the most valuable resources to your dog. 

  • If you’re dishing it out FREELY, how is it supposed to be used as a reward when the dog does do something right?

STRUCTURE STRATEGY 

  • Feed ALL meals inside the crate.  

    • DO NOT MESS WITH THE DOG WHILE IT’S EATING OR DRINKING!

  • Have a predictable daily schedule so the dog learns a healthy pattern for potty breaks, meals, exercise, and play times. 

    • The more consistent the schedule, the less your dog has to worry about and think… “What’s next…”

  • Utilize the crate when you are NOT home and during short stents even when you are home.  Dog’s nap A LOT, so think of the crate as their bedroom to do that in. 

    • This crating when you are home also greatly reduces the chance of dogs developing Separation Anxiety, which is a dog's addiction to attention.  

CRATE TRAINING

  • Helps not only safeguard your house, but also safeguards your dog from getting into things that could be harmful and is a great tool to use with any behavior modification. Just ask any professional dog trainer, they use & promote crates A LOT! 

  • FEED MAJORITY IF NOT ALL MEALS INSIDE THE CRATE!

  • High value chew items allowed/given INSIDE the crate. 

  • Food Toss GAME: 

    • Step 1 Throw a high value treat inside the crate for your dog to go get, let them come out and do it again. Repeat 8-12 times

    • Step 2 by throwing the treat to the back of the crate, close the door behind them, wait for them to turn around, and then release them after a 3-5 seconds. Repeat 8-12 times

    • Step 3 by doing step 2 but now actually latch the crate door and drop a few nuggets inside the door; walk away for 30 seconds, come back & let them out. Repeat 8-12 times, varying the intervals of “in” time from 30 seconds to 2 minutes. 

 

COMMANDS/CUES 

  • These are words or phrases the dog has some familiarity with. 

  • They are taught ON LEASH and/or with TREATS. 

Commands: Cues:

Sit = Put butt on ground Yes = Reward from hand, food or toy

Down = Lying down on ground Good = Keep doing what you’re doing

“Dogs Name” Come = Recall No = You’re incorrect; conditioned via leash pop

Leave It = Do not go after item 

Place = Go to your bed

Kennel = Go to your crate

HAVE QUESTIONS? PLEASE reach out to us! 260-463-4142

Teaching Recall

Leash Training

Crate Training

Needed items for going home

More Crate Training

Walking/ heeling

Decompression

Managing your new dog

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